Skip to main content

Full text of "The Tattler"

See other formats


SOPH 



■ 



I Hi;; 



•aWfl 



ti\ 



■ 



■ 



■ 



H 



■ 



V 1 -"* - 



■ 



,»iJ<'; 



#&'-». 



m I 



■ 






MflB&H 



■ 



n 



&*»■: 



•vA.t, 



Hd 



Hi 



h 






m|i 



m 




WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE 



TATTL 




R 






19 




37 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 





I 



fontratr tirta taattr nf ©Ijf ©attlrr 
tn thp Inning nmnnrn, nf 
Mrs. (grarr $ttrtrk 



THE LIFE OF GRACE F. MIRICK 

Grace Fidelia James, daughter of our beloved 
Mrs. James, was born in Williamsburg, November 
20, 1865. She was educated at Smith College and 
married John W. Gillette, a graduate of Williams 
College. They lived on a beautiful estate in Hud- 
son-on-the-Hudson until Mr. Gillette's death in 
1921. In 1926 Mrs. Gillette married George 
Mirick, a lecturer at Harvard College. They 
made their home in Brookline, often spending the 
summer at Williamsburg. After Mrs. James's 
death Mrs. Mirick strove to fill her mother's 
place in so far as it was possible. She was 
warmly interested in all activities of the commun- 
ity. Her generosity and graciousness constantly re- 
minded us of her mother. Mr. and Mrs. Mirick 
were a common and welcome sight at all school 
functions, always gracing alumni banquets and 
graduation exercises with their presence. Many 
of us younger ones had known Mrs. James mainly 
through the memorial of her good works. But 
Mrs. Mirick was an actuality to us, smiling in 
friendly fashion, praising our feeble attempts, and 
offering encouragement. Through her we were 
better able to appreciate the loving memory of 
Mrs. James. The news of her death on Septem- 
ber 11, 1936 brought deep grief to everyone. 



THE TATTLER 
Williamsburg High School 



Editor-in-Chief, Annetta Barrus '37 

Assistant Editors, Margaret Linehan '38, Wendell Pittsinger '37 

Business Manager, Robert Bisbee '37 

Assistant Managers, William Howe '37, Vernon West '37 



Phyllis Damon '37 
Ruth Barrus '37 
Fern Mosher '37 



Associate Editors 



Wniifred Packard '37 
Ruth Black '38 
Richard Ames '38 



Faculty Adviser, Mary T. Walsh 



CLASS MOTTO: 
Courage, Loyalty and Truth 



Contents 



Dedication 
In Memoriam 
Senior Class 
Address of Welcome 
Class History 
Class Prophecy . 
Prophecy on the Prophetess 
Class Will 
Class Grinds 
Class Statistics 
Class Night 
Graduation 
Class of '38 
Class of '39 
Class of '40 
Editorials 
Literary 

Pro merito — Senior 
Junior 
Forensic Group 
Basketball — Boys' 
Baseball 

Basketball — Girls' 
Jokes and Song Hits 
Alumni Notes 
Illinois Trip 
New England Speech Tournament 



3 
4 
6 
12 
12 
13 
16 
17 
18 
19 
19 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
39 




LOTTIE ANNE ALGUSTOSKI 



"Tuski" 



"Quiet, calm, she seems to be 

But there is no girl more gay than she." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert 3; Entrant in Glee Club 
Contest 3; Archery 3; Prom Committee 3; Play Commit- 
tee 3; Forensic Club 3, 4; Operetta 4. 






ANNETTA MARION BARRUS "TET" 

"And still the wonder grew 

That one small head cotdd carry all she knew." 

Vice-President 2, 4; President Debating Society 3, 4; 
Debating 2, 3, 4; Literary Editor Tattler 3; Editor-in- 
chief Tattler 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; President Glee Club 
4; Entrant in Glee Club Contest 3; Entrant in State 
Speech Tournament 3, 4; Entrant in District Tournament 
4 ; Entrant in New England Speech Tournament 4 ; En- 
trant in National Tournament 4; President Pro Merito So- 
ciety 4; Dramatics 3; National Forensic Key; Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Graduation Essay; Pro Merito. 



RUTH EMELINE BARRUS 

"For she is such a fair girl with ways forever new : 
Her hair is sunlight yellow and eyes a morning blue." 

Associate Editor Tattler 4; Glee Club 1, 2. 3, 4; En- 
trant in Glee Club Contest 3; Glee Club Treasurer 3; 
Dramatics 3; Entrant in District Tournament 3; Entrant 
in State Speech Tournament 3; Archery 3; Concert 3; 
Costume Committee 3; Forensic Club 3, 4; Debating 
Executive Committee 3, 4; Class Will; Pro Merito. 



ROBERT LYMAN BISBEE 



'Bob" 



"On argument alone my faith is built." 

Class President 3, 4; Pro Merito; Vice-President Debat- 
ing Society 3, 4; Mass. State Speech Tournament 3, 4; 
Forensic Key; Basketball 3, 4; Baseball 4; Manager Base- 
ball 3; Ass't Manager Basketball 3; New England Speech 
Tournament 3; National Speech Tournament 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Business Manager Junior-Senior Plays, 3, 
4; Plays 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Ass't Editor Tattler 3; Busi- 
ness Manager Tattler 4; Honorable Mention in State-Wide 
Contest on Futility of War. 



LILLIAN MADELINE BLANCHARD "Lil" 
"Quiet persons are welcome everywhere." 
Glee Club 2; Concert 3; Forensic 3, 4. 



BARBARA RUTH BURT "Bob" 

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Archery 3; Concert 3; Forensic 
Club 3, 4; Play Committee 3, 4; Manager Girls' Basketball 
Team 4; Entrant in Glee Club Contest 3. 



LAWRENCE CORBETT "Lefty" 

"Curled minion, dancer, coiner of sweet words." 

Basketball; Baseball; Dramatics; Ticket Committee for 
Class Plays. 



*fc 






RUTH ELIZABETH COUSINO 



"Ruthie" 



'She was always late on principle her principle being that 
punctuality is the thief of time." 

Costume Committee 4. 





PHYLLIS RUTH DAMON "PhyF 

"Her very frowns are fairer far 
Than smiles of other maidens are." 

Pro Merito; Vice-President Pro Merito Society 4; Class 
History; Literary Editor Tattler 4; Class Secretary 1, 2; 
Secretary Debating Society 3; Treasurer Debating Society 
4; Forensic Club 3, 4; Forensic Key; Entrant in State 
Speech Tournament 3, 4; Entrant in New England Speech 
Tournament 4; Entrant in Glee Club Contest 3; First in 
District Tournament 3; Second in District Tournament 4; 
Basketball 1, 2; Cheer Leader 1, 2, 3, 4; Archery 3; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 4; Concert 3; Casting Committee 
3, 4; Dramatics 3, 4. 



CHRISTINE FIELD 



'Chris" 



"Trouble may knock at her door, but on seeing her smile 
will hurry away." 

Glee Club 1, 2; Archery 3; Prom Committee 3; Concert 
3; Forensic Club 3, 4. 



EDWARD CHARLES FONTAINE "Chippy" 

"Whom neither shape of anger can dismay, 
Nor thought of tender happiness betray." 

Forensic Club 3, 4; Forensic 4. 




DOROTHY ROSE HARRISON "Dot" 

"A merry heart is a purse well-lined." 
Basketball 1, 3, 4; Archery 3; Play Committee 4. 




WILLIAM WAYNE HOWE "Billy" 

"Wit, now and then, struck smartly, shows a spark." 

Class President 1; Class Treasurer 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 4; 
Class Play 4; Prom Committee 3; Ass't Editor Tattler 4; 
Joke Editor Tattler 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 
Captain 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4, Baseball Captain 4. 



HELEN ELEANOR KOLOSEWICZ 

"Duty well done is noble." 

Glee Club 1, 2; Archery 3; Concert 3; Prom Committee 3; 
Forensic Club 3, 4; Dramatics 4; Casting Committee for 
Plays 4; Pro Merito; Graduation Oration. 



ADELINE MERRITT "Addie" 

"In fields of air she writes her name 
And treads the chambers of the sky!" 

Glee Club 1, 2; Concert 3; Prom Committee 3; Tattler 
Staff 3; Forensic Club 3, 4; District Speech Tournament 
4; State Speech Tournament 4; Casting Committee 4; Pro 
Merito; Class Statistics 4. 



INEZ FERN MOSHER 

"Just a swift glance of her illumined smile 
along the landscape goes." 

Vice-President 1; Secretary 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Casting Committee 4; Dramatics 3, 4; Prom Committee 
3; Cheer Leader 3, 4; Senior Banquet Committee 4; Pro 
Merito; Member Pro Merito Society 3, 4; Alumni Editor 
Tattler 4; Operetta 4; Archery 3; Concert 3; Forensic 
Club 3, 4; Class Prophecy; Entrant in Glee Club Con- 
test 3. 




LENA MARIE NIETSCHE 

"So sweet the blush of bashfulness, 
E'en pity scarce can wish it less." 

Glee Club 1, 2; Costume Committee 3, 4; Archery 3; 
Forensic Club 3, 4. 




KATHERINE ROSE OZZOLEK "Red" 

"Good-humored, frank, and free." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Concert 3; Foren- 
sic Committee 3; Archery 3; Forensic Club 2, 3, 4; Operet- 
ta 4; Prom Committee 3; Treasurer Class 4; Entrant in 
Glee Club Contest 3 ; Senior Banquet Committee 4. 



WINIFRED DORIS PACKARD "Winnie" 

"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Entrant in Glee Club Contest 3; De- 
bating 3; Entrant in State Speech Tournament 3, 4; 
Executive Committee of Debating Society 3, 4; Entrant in 
New England Speech Tournament 4; Third Prize in Tem- 
perance Essay Contest 3; Dramatics 3; Casting Committee 
3; Prom Committee 3; Concert 3; Ass't Editor Tattler 4; 
Class Secretary 4; Grinds of Class 4; Pro Merito. 



JANICE HARRIET PENN 

"Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content; 
The quiet mind is richer than a crown." 




WENDELL HERBERT PITTSINGER 



"Dilly" 



"Thy wit is as quick as the greyhound's mouth; 
it catches." 

Class Treasurer 2 ; Class Vice-President 3 ; Debating 1 3, 
4, Treasurer of Debating Society 3, Secretary of Debating 
Society 4; Assistant Editor Tattler 4; Pro Merito; Pro- 
phecy on Prophetess ; Class Play 3, 4. 




WARREN HOLMES RUSSELL "Rip" 

"Sleep it is a gentle thing, beloved from pole to pole." 

Baceball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Class Play 3; Proper- 
ties Committee 4. 



EDNA MARION THAYER "Eppie" 

"I have a heart with room for every joy." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert 3; 
Archery 3; Forensic Club 3, 4; Captain Girls' Basketball 
Team 4; Chairman Costume Committee 4; Entrant in Glee 
Club Contest 3. 



VERNON PERSSE WEST "Tackie" 

"On with the dance! Let joy be unconfined." 

Glee Club 1, 2; Debating 2, 3; Entrant State Speech 
Tournament 3, 4; Entrant New England District Speech 
Tournament 4; Chairman Senior Property Committee for 
Forensic Plays 4; Forensic Plays 3, 4; Executive Commit- 
tee Debating Society 4; Assistant Business Manager Tat- 
tler 4; Forensic Club 2. 3, 4; Forensic Key; Prom Com- 
mittee 3. 



12 



THE TATTLER 



Address of Welcome 



Parents, Teachers, Friends: 

It is with pleasure that in behalf of the 
class of 1937, I greet you here tonight. 

To you parents, we give special welcome 
that we may take this opportunity to pub- 
licly show our appreciation of your sympa- 
thetic understanding and support, your en- 
couragement in times of our failures, and 
your pleasure in our success. 

To you teachers, we do appreciate your 



untiring efforts and patience in guiding our 
steps, which were faltering at times, to be 
sure, on the pathway to knowledge and the 
success we all hope to attain. 

To you our loyal friends, we are indebt- 
ed for the cooperation and interest that 
have made our four years happy ones. 

We sincerely hope that you will enjoy 
our class night exercises. 

Robert Bisbee '37. 



Class History 



Dear Diary, 

For four long years you'll be our guide 

And memories recall 

We'll go together, side by side 

Through Burgy High School halls. 

September 5, 1933. 

We started on our four year journey 
through the Helen E. James High School at 
nine this morning. We seem very small 
beside the dignified seniors. With forty- 
eight of us I'm sure our four teachers, Miss 
Dunphy, Mrs. Warner, Miss Walsh, and Mr. 
Foster will have their hands full. 
About September 13, 1933. 

The sophomores, juniors, and seniors are 
going around the school with gloomy ex- 
pressions. We can't find out what the 
trouble is. 
September 15, 1933. 

The mystery has finally been solved. Miss 
Dunphy announced today that there is to 
be no Freshman Reception. They can't 
even put ribbons on us. Hurrah! 
September 22, 1933. 

Chester King, the senior class president 
was master of ceremonies at our class meet- 
ing today. We've become fairly well ac- 
quainted with our school but we seemed to 
need help with our parliamentary procedure. 
We elected William Howe, president; Fern 
Mosher, vice-president; Phyllis Damon, sec- 
retary, and Stanley Newell, treasurer. 
The Saturdays of May. 

Someone must have decided that we were 
not absorbing enough knowledge. We have 
to attend school on Saturdays. (Oh, yes, 
I almost forgot. We had two extra weeks 
during September because of sickness.) 



September 13, 1934. 

We are back for our second year of learn- 
ing. Evidently we didn't wear our teach- 
ers out for we still have the same four. 
There seems to be only one difficulty this 
year — we can't initiate the freshmen. Now 
we know how the upperclassmen felt last 
year. 
September 13, 1934. 

The officers chosen to lead us throughout 
our sophomore year were elected today. 
They are: Richard Graves, president; An- 
netta Barrus, vice-president; Phyllis Damon, 
secretary ; and Wendell Pittsinger, treasur- 
er. 
January, February, and March 1935. 

During these months we have had sev- 
eral basketball stars in our class. We aren't 
winning many games but we're sure to suc- 
ceed soon. 

Also during these months, even though 
sophomores, we enjoyed several dances 
which the senior orchestra put on for the 
students. 
September 1935. 

This year, evidently because the juniors 
are too far ahead in their studies, there is 
another teacher in the faculty — Miss Baker. 
Equally as new is a Spoken English course. 
September 9, 1935. 

Two years have passed since we entered 
high school and several students have left. 
Now there are only twenty-five of us. From 
these twenty-five we elected our officers: 
Robert Bisbee, president; Wendell Pittsin- 
ger, vice-president; Fern Mosher, secretary, 
and William Howe, treasurer. 
January and February. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



Wonder of wonders ! The Burgy High 
School basketball team has really been 
grand this winter. (Of course there are 
several juniors on the team. ) This year 
we have been invited to attend and to play 
at the Basketball Tournament to be held at 
Mass. State on March fifth. 
March 5, 1936. 

We trimmed Sanderson. Our school was 
praised highly both for its playing and for 
its cheering section. 
March 27-28. 

The speech tournament was held in Wil- 
liamsburg this weekend. Our school was 
honored by the fact that we had one senior 
who was eligible to enter the national tour- 
nament this spring. 
May 15, 1936. 

The glee club left for Boston today to 
enter the State Music Contest. 
May 16, 1936. 

Our glee club received the highest score 
of any school in Massachusetts. 
May 22, 1936. 

The best Prom in the history of Wil- 
liamsburg High School was held at the 
Helen E. James School tonight. The hall 
was a picture of beauty. Of course the 
reason it was such a success was the fact 
that the juniors put it on. 
June 25, 1936. 

At last we are out of school for the sum- 
mer. This is what we waited for. Now 
we are seniors. 
September 8, 1936. 

Something strange happened this morn- 
ing. Twenty-five seniors arrived at the 
Helen E. James School. But where is their 
dignity? 
September 10, 1936. 

The last officers of the class of '37 were 
elected today. Robert Bisbee is president; 
Annetta Barrus, vice-president; Winnie 
Packard, secretary, and Katherine Ozzolek, 
treasurer. Mr. Foster is our faculty adviser. 
September 25, 1936. 

This year, because the freshmen seem 



more dignified than the seniors, we decided 
to have a Freshman Reception. It was a 
great success. Even the seniors learned to 
dance. The freshmen were not the only 
ones to be initiated. Because Mr. Foster is 
to be our faculty adviser it was necessary 
for him to perform also and we are now 
convinced that Mr. Foster should be a 
dancing instructor. 
October 23, 1936. 

We seniors decided to be different so we 
had a poverty party tonight. I didn't know 
there were so many old clothes in Williams- 
burg. 
December 23, 1936. 

Tonight was our last Christmas dance. 
We wanted to make it a grand affair so we 
had a leap year dance. It didn't stay 
strictly girls' choice though — the boys were 
too impatient. 
January 4, 1937. 

When we returned today Miss Curran was 
taking Miss Riley's place. 
February 1937. 

I couldn't be expected to know what went 
on in February — not when I was in quar- 
antine for Scarlet fever. 
March 4, 1937. 

Our boys' basketball team starred again 
at M. S. C. 
March and April. 

Several seniors were entrants in the 
speech tournaments in Charlton, Laconia, 
New Hampshire and Jacksonville, Illinois. 
We didn't bring home any honors, but we 
had a marvelous time. 
June 14-18, 1937. 

The seniors are too busy taking their fin- 
al exams to even think about making his- 
tory. 
June 22, 1937. 

Just think tonight is Class Night. Thurs- 
day is Graduation. 
And so dear book, of treasures rare 
Slumber in peaceful rest 
You've told the history of '37 
Now may your dreams be blest. 

Phyllis Damon. 



§s 



It was the third period in the morning. 
The room was warm and I was tired so I 
put my head on my desk to rest. I must 
have dozed off, for the next thing that I 



can remember was that I was traveling in 
the western states. It must have been in 
the year 1952 for on one of the bill-boards 
was advertised "The Golddiggers of 1952 



14 



THE TATTLER 



now playing at the Casino." I had been 
travelling for hours when the bus finally 
stopped at the station where I was to get 
off. 

Being quite hungry, I naturally looked 
for a place to eat. I had no more than 
opened the door when the head waiter, a 
very familiar looking fellow, although he 
was rather stooped and bald, walked up to 
me and asked, "May I help you?" He 
helped me take off my coat and then showed 
me a table in a secluded corner of the room. 
He pulled my chair out with such grace and 
ease that I knew he was a very experienced 
waiter. He reminded me of an old friend 
but I couldn't quite place him. "Oh, if 
only I could remember." After I had given 
my order he remained standing beside me. 
I thought this rather odd so I said, "That's 
all — please hurry, will you? Oh, just a 
minute. — You can bring me a grape soda 
if you have one." 

"Grape soda ! Oh, I know you now. It's 
Fern Mosher. Do you remember me?" 

"Wendell! Yes, of course. How are you? 
What have you been doing? Tell me all 
about yourself? How did you ever happen 
to choose this vocation?" 

"Well, do you remember a certain trip 
I took to Illinois while in high school? It 
was on this trip that I came to like this 
work." 

After telling each other all about our- 
selves we started talking about old Burgy 
High and our classmates. 

"Have you heard from my old pal, Lot- 
tie Toski?" I asked. 

"Oh, it's funny", Wendell answered. "I 
must tell you about it. While home on a 
vacation about a month ago, I went hunting 
up in the woods way beyond Chesterfield. 
I came upon a large cabin. As I approached 
it, I heard a very angry but familiar voice 
say, "Junior, get me some wood and hurry 
about it." As I was very thirsty I thought 
I could get a drink here. After hearing the 
voice, I was not surprised when the door 
opened to see Lottie standing there. Her 
hair was gray but I recognized her by her 
smile. She had married that wood chopper 
we used to kid her about in high school 
and now has hve cute children — one is just 
the image of Lottie." 

When Wendell finished I laughed. "I'd 
like to see her," I remarked. 

"Lottie told me some news about some 



of our classmates," Wendell said. "You 
remember Dot Harrison, don't you? She 
owns and operates a beauty parlor in North- 
ampton. She's doing fine, so Lottie said." 

"I must tell you something else", Wendell 
added. "Did you hear about Christine Field 
and Warren Russell?" 

"No," I answered, surprised that he 
coupled these names. 

"That's the way I took it," Wendell said, 
"but it so happens that they're married now. 
They live on a large fox farm up in Worth- 
ington, and are they prosperous?" 

"Another surprise," Wendell said — 
scarcely pausing for breath. "Lillian Blan- 
chard's teaching American History at Wil- 
liamsburg High." 

"American History," I exclaimed. 

"Sure enough. She's taken Mrs. War- 
ner's place. Mrs. Warner's retired now. 
You see, Lil went to Smith College after 
leaving Burgy and the very year she grad- 
uated she became engaged to a young fel- 
low named Joe — well, I can't think of his 
last name. I guess they just weren't meant 
to be married, for a short time later Lil 
broke the engagement. After that she 
started teaching American History." 

I always knew that Lil loved History so 
I wasn't too surprised. 

As it was getting late, I thought I had 
better leave but Wendell insisted that I wait 
a few minutes and go to a show with him 
for he was getting through soon. 

After leaving the restaurant we walked 
toward the center of the city. We had 
not gone far when we noticed a large gath- 
ering in the street. Of course we walked 
over to see what the excitement was. The 
usual high-pressure salesman was holding 
aloft a bottle of hair-tonic guaranteed to 
produce wonderful results. We started to 
walk away when suddenly someone said, 
"Now, Mr. Edward Fontaine will speak to 
you on "Why Men Shouldn't be Bald." 
Chippy — It couldn't be, but it surely was. 
After he had finished a brief discourse filled 
with scientific terms we went to chat with 
him. His expression conveyed his surprise 
at seeing us. He told us that he had to do 
something to support himself and the family 
and this had proved the easiest way. 

"The family," I said, "so you're mar- 
ried?" 

"Sure, I am. Come and meet my wife." 
Who should she be but another school pal — 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



15 



Edna Thayer. The same old Edna — not 
changed a bit. She greeted us effusively 
and we immediately began talking about old 
times and pals. 

"You haven't heard about any of your 
friends from Burgy have you?" Wendell 
asked. 

"Oh, a few," Edna answered. 

"Well, tell us about 'em," I exclaimed. 

"Remember that old romance of Winnie 
Packard's and Bob Bisbee's?" 

"Yes!" 

"Well, it ended. They're married now. 
They bought the Gables and as the roller 
skating didn't prove too successful, they 
turned it into an ice skating rink. It's very 
successful now." 

"Good," I exclaimed. 

"Oh, I must tell you. They held an ice 
skating contest and who do you suppose won 
it? Phil Damon. Even though troubled 
with the burdens of house keeping she was 
more graceful than any other contestant. 
That's what I read in the papers anyway." 

"Why, is she married too?" I asked. 

"Yes, she had to keep up the family rec- 
ord. Remember the Kelloggs — That's the 
answer." 

Being quite late we insisted that we had 
to go if we wanted to see a show. 

"Why don't you come along?" I asked. 

"We will if you wait a minute," Edward 
said. 

The four of us started for the show. On 
the bill-board were pictures of a girl and 
also another couple that looked familiar. 
Under the girl's name was "Madame Ozzo- 
lek, Famous Parisian Dancer." "Gee! — she 
looked like Kay — could it be she?" I won- 
dered. 

When the show started the first act on the 
program was the "Madame Ozzolek". The 
four of us recognized her at once as our 
pal — Kay. When she had finished her 
beautiful dance she stood in the center of 
the stage to recite her favorite poem 
"Invictus". We decided to go see Kay after 
the show. 

The announcer stated "These acrobats in 
the next act need no introduction — they are 
known throughout the world as the "Flying 
Corbetts". 

"How thrilling," I murmured, "but when 
I saw the breath-taking actions of these 
acrobats I thought they would be killed. It 
was not until they bowed their thanks to 



the thundering applause that I recognized 
Lawrence Corbett and Annetta Barrus. 

We went back stage immediately after 
the performance to congratulate our old 
pals. While talking to them they mentioned 
the fact that Vernon West, after being dis- 
appointed in love by a certain Junior, devot- 
ed his life to the interests of South Africa. 
He was now teaching the natives "Why one 
should become more than just a plain chauf- 
feur." 

"Guess who the manager of the theatre 
is," Annette asked. 

"Why, I couldn't imagine," I answered. 
"Come on and I'll show you." 
Who was it but Lena Nietsche. But who 
could have guessed it. She was a platinum 
blonde with twinkling brown eyes and a 
great amount of make-up. What a changed 
Lena. 

She told us that Bill Howe was a famous 
chemist at Harvard now. He writes articles 
on chemistry for magazines and newspa- 
pers and recently she read an article which 
Bill wrote entitled, "Why Care Should be 
Taken in Use of Chemicals." "So like Bill," 
I thought. 

After leaving the theatre we went to a 
soda shoppe to get a soda. Who should 
come to wait on us but another classmate- 
Janice Penn. We recognized her by her 
famous smile. 

She told us that if we stayed a few min- 
utes we could hear another of our class- 
mates over the radio. We naturally stayed 
to hear who it could possibly be. It was 
Ruth Earrus. She was now the famous 
"Blues Singer" on Rudy Vallee's program. 
She sang beautifully. Her first number was 
a song of her own composition entitled 
"Bobby Boy." 

"I have a surprise for you this evening. I 
have brought three of my high school pals 
to entertain you. Two of the girls are 
heard often on the radio and the other is 
more famous on the stage. The two heard 
on the radio have recently signed a con- 
tract to take "Amos and Andy's" place as 
"Sue and Cecile" — they are Barbara Burt 
and Ruth Cousino. The other is the most 
famous tap dancer in the world. She is 
known as the fastest tap dancer — Helen Ko- 
losewicz." 

What luck! Now we had mentioned every- 
thing that my classmates were doing but 



16 



THE TATTLER 



one — Adeline Merritt — and the world was 
talking about her. 

"How would you like to be about two 
miles up in the air over the Pacific Ocean 
in a new sort of air ship?" Wendell asked. 

"Not me — I feel much safer on the 
ground. Thanks just the same. She always 
wanted to do that so I'm glad she has the 
chance. Well, let's go — " 

"Fern! — Fern! I could hear someone 



calling my name distinctly but I couldn't 
imagine who — Hey, Fern — wake up — the 
bell just rang and you've got to get to Typ- 
ing Class." 

"What class — I'm — Oh — h — h — it was 
only a dream?" 

"What are you talking about?" 
"Oh nothing," I answered, yawning. 
"Let's go to class." 

Fern Mosher '37 



Prophecy on the Prophetess 



In 1952 I was traveling in South Ameri- 
ca for my health. I decided to go to Rio 
de Janeiro as an old friend of mine was 
U. S. Ambassador to Brazil. 

Arriving there in a plane of the Trans- 
continental Airways I went directly to the 
embassy. I inquired at the desk if my 
friend the Ambassador would see me. 
The clerk replied that I would be an- 
nounced, so I gave him my card and waited 
for his return. 

I was rather drowsy from the heat and 
did not notice when the clerk returned. The 
first noise I was conscious of was a heartily 
exclaimed, "Well, look what we've got 
here." I thought I recognized the voice but 
when I opened my eyes I looked upon a 
woman, whom I never remembered having 
seen before. As I rose hesitantly from my 
seat to take her proffered hand I noticed 
that I had to look up to see her face. She 
was slender and blonde, of a decided plati- 
num type. 

I had not fully regained my composure 
when she started firing questions at me, 
"How are you? How is everything back 
home?" And so on. I decided that the 
woman had either mistaken me for an ac- 
quaintance or was an escaped inmate of 
some insanity hospital. 

Finally the woman became impatient and 
exclaimed, "Well, why don't you say some- 
thing." 

I was decidedly embarrassed but man- 
aged to blurt out, "I beg your pardon, Ma- 
dam, but I am afraid you have mistaken 



me." At this she laughed, a ringing, mu- 
sical sound, which I was sure I had heard 
before, and replied, "You can't fool me, 
Wendell Pittsinger, I'd know you if you 
were bald." 

That made me suspicious, because I had 
heard remarks like that before, yet, "How 
could it be," I asked myself as I glanced at 
her. I finally remarked casually, "You 
wouldn't by any chance be Fern Mosher — " 

But I could see by the twinkle in her eye 
that my guess was correct. 

"However," said I, "that only explains 
one thing. Why, in high school, I could 
look right over your head, and you did have 
a slight excess of avoirdupois." 

She laughed again and started explain- 
ing, "Shortly after I finished college, a most 
miraculous thing happened. I began slow- 
ly but surely to gain in height. My weight 
didn't increase so you see it had to go 
somewhere and the only way seemed to be 
up." 

"And was the tranformation of your 
hair a freak of nature also?" 

"No," she laughed and looked a little 
ashamed, "that is just a fad. Don't you like 
it?" 

That put me on the spot and as I have 
never been a good bluffer I told her frank- 
ly that I preferred brunettes. 

After a few days of pleasant chatter, I 
left for the North, musing over the vast 
changes in Miss Fern Mosher, Ambassador- 
ess. 

Wendell Pittsinger '37. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 



Class Will 



Hear ye ! Hear ye ! Announcing the 
departure of the Class of 1937 from Wil- 
liamsburg High School. Their wits and 
sense having been gathered together, as 
usual, they do hereby declare and publish 
their last will and testament. 

The entire class bequeaths its sincere gra- 
titude to the members of the faculty for 
their hearty cooperation in aiding us 
through our four years of high school. 

1. To the class of 1938, we leave the 
privilege of becoming those perfect seniors 
that this school for years has sought. 

2. To the class of 1939, provided they 
will grow up, we will the privilege of be- 
coming next year's juniors. 

3. To the infants of the High School, 
the class of 1940, we bequeath our extra- 
ordinary dignity of which they are badly 
in need. 

4. Lottie Toski gives those giggles which 
burst out at very odd times to Florence 
Packard. 

5. Annetta Barrus leaves some of her 
excess brains to anyone who believes in the 
communistic plan of dividing things equally. 

6. The car that Robert Bisbee drives is 
bequeathed to Douglas Fairbanks, in case 
his breaks down, so that Doug can stay 
after school when the girls have Glee Club 
practice. 

7. The powerful voice that Lillian Blan- 
chard rarely used in class is willed to Mar- 
ion Sabo for she'll lose hers by her senior 
year at the rate she's started. 

8.' Barbara Burt leaves her small size 
to Janice Wells. 

9. Lawrence Corbett wills that sort of 
half-way grin to Francis Molloy who feels 
that his face would break if he cracked a 
smile. 

10. Ruth Cousino leaves her indepen- 
dent ways to Ashton Rustemeyer. 

11. Phyllis Damon says that she hasn't 
much to give away but she'll will her driv- 
ing tutor to anyone with her amount of 
charm. 

12. The kisses that Christine Field 
learned how to make on the typewriter are 
left to Edith Packard if she'll use them 
with discretion. 

13. Edward Fontaine bequeaths his 



dancing ability to Jeannette Wright so that 
at next Freshman Reception she'll be better 
able to "trip it" with Mr Foster. 

14. Dorothy Harrison's mischievous lit- 
tle winks are left to Hazel Finkle. Dorothy 
says they're a great asset. 

15. Billy Howe says that he needs his 
driving license to court the girls and hasn't 
anything else to will. 

16. To the freshman science class Helen 
Kolosewicz wills her numerous A's. 

17. Adeline Merritt leaves Jean Carney 
the privilege of asking Mr. Foster all the 
questions that she has not had time to ask. 

18. Fern Mosher's ability to write notes 
to the boys is willed to Hazel Packard, — 
if Hazel thinks she needs it. 

19. Lena Nietsche wills her stately car- 
riage to Mildred Sanderson. 

20. Katherine Ozzolek's willingness is 
bequeathed to any one of the freshman boys. 

21. Winifred Packard leaves her cheer- 
fulness to the whole school to make it a 
happier place. 

22. Janice Penn's quiet ways are willed 
to Emily Ames. 

23. Donald Mollison is given Wendell 
Pittsinger's ability to sing bass, tenor, and 
soprano. 

24. Warren Russell's gift of gabbing 
with the girls is left to Betty Penn to use 
on the boys if her tongue ever get un- 
wound. 

25. The basketball ability of Edna 
Thayer is bequeathed to Helen Childs if 
she'll eat her spinach. 

26. "Tacky" West wishes to leave the 
privilege of taking certain Searsville inhabi- 
tants roller skating to Frank Taylor — Or 
does he? 

27. Lastly we will our record number of 
pro merito students to the sophomore class 
which really seems hopeless at times. 

In testimony thereof, we hereunto set our 
hand and seal upon this our last will and 
testament in the year of our Lord, one 
thousand nine hundred and thirty-seven. 

THE CLASS OF 1937. 
Witnesses: 

The Duke of Windsor 
Jack Benny 
Fred Allen 



THE TATTLER 



Class Grinds 



Subject to much admiration, 

Is this graduating class; 

For its brilliant and sparkling students, 

Have weathered the test at last. 

Now though my learned class-mates 
Seem angels, from afar, 
We must have a few little tell-tales 
To show them as they are. 



This Senior class can boast a clown, 
You know that's Warren Russell, 
Who loves to fall asleep in class, 
But never likes to hustle. 

Our Conway member's Dorothy. 
One never sees her vexed ; 
But watch her hand fly to her face, 
Whenever she's perplexed. 

Lillian Blanchard seems to be 
Mosts lady-like all day. 
Some think she would achieve success 
As stand-in for Martha Raye. 

Our Adeline is sad to be 
A girl and not a boy. 
We hope that as an aviatrix, 
Her nights will bring her joy. 

Vernon West is usually seen, 
Beside one Junior lassie. 
Since he has been to dancing school, 
His waltz steps are quite classy. 

A mathematician from the start, 
Ruth Barrus, comely twin. 
She's always dashing to Mass. State. 
Now who's Ruth trying to win? 

Since Lawrence Corbett has returned 
With such attractive curls, 
We notice he succeeds quite well 
In charming all the girls ! 

Barbara Burt is very petite, 

But she has lots of friends. 

Her smiling face, with cheerful glow 

A bit of sunshine lends. 

Look there at Wendell Pittsinger 
With wise old owl expression. 



His merry chuckle and unmatched wit 
Have made a great impression. 

Ruth Cousino hums all the day. 
We know she must be merry; 
But oft' she's late to history class 
We wonder what's her hurry. 

Lena Nietsche strolls sedately 
Head high in the air; 
It seems the boys have packs of fun, 
In mussing up her hair. 

Fern Mosher has acquired the art 
Of attracting male attention. 
Flirtation is her little game 
But what is her intention? 

Wee Lottie doesn't make much noise 
Unless she's giggling out. 
In class you'd hardly know she's there 
Until you glance about. 

Now Billy Howe looks innocent, 
But all the while he's scheming 
Some little prank or trick to play 
On someone lost in dreaming. 

Winsome lassie, of beauty fair, 
Such a bundle of charm is she ; 
Phyllis is Princess of our class; 
Now who could Prince Charming be? 

Robert is president of our class 
A clever business man; 
But oft' deep blushes we perceive 
Beneath his natural tan. 

Though Janice lately joined our ranks 
We like her just the same. 
She's very peaceful, friendly too; 
We're truly glad she came ! 

'Tis Christine who echoes a musical laugh, 
When little things happen to please her; 
But how she vehemently protests, 
Whenever we playfully tease her. 

Full of mischief is Edna Thayer, 

Her mascot's a Scotty pup ; 

But that doesn't explain the reason why 

She's always cutting up. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 



Annetta is high Pro Merito 
Her thoughts are original too ; 
But her zestful spirit and lively ways 
Are sure to interest you ! 

Katherine Ozzolek with naming hair, 
Is seldom without sweets. 
How very generous Katty is, 
Especially with her treats ! 



Helen is truly a studious girl, 
Who never wastes a minute ; 
Nor does she giggle or chat in class, 
She finds no merit in it. 

And so you have them, twenty-four, 
To whom we have alluded. 
Of course I do not need to say, 
That's with myself included. 



Edward Fontaine's puzzling And so these four grand years must end 

So silent are his ways; The final evening draws nigh. 

To overcome his bashfulness Until graduation night we are : 

Would take him days and days. The Seniors of Williamsburg High ! 

Winifred Packard 

Class Statistics 

Prettiest Girl — Ruth Barrus Girl with most pleasing personality — 

Handsomest Boy — Lawrence Corbett Annetta Barrus 

Most popular girl — Phyllis Damon Boy with most pleasing personality — 

Most popular boy — Robert Bisbee Robert Bisbee 

Best girl dancer — Lottie Algustoski Girl most likely to succeed — Annetta Barrus 

Best boy dancer — Vernon West Boy most likely to succeed — Robert Bisbee 

Best dressed girl — Phyllis Damon Jolliest girl — Winnie Packard 

Best dressed boy — Lawrence Corbett Jolliest boy — Billy Howe 

Loudest girl — Katherine Ozzolek Most bashful girl — Lena Nietsche 

Loudest boy — Billy Howe Most bashful boy — Edward Fontaine 

Quietest Girl — Janice Penn Most business-like girl — Helen Kolosewicz 

Laziest girl — Lillian Blanchard Most business-like boy — Robert Bisbee 

Laziest boy — Warren Russell Model girl student — Annetta Barrus 

Class Vamp — Fern Mosher Model boy student — Robert Bisbee 

Class Sheik — Vernon West Most carefree girl — Winifred Packard 

Smartest girl — Annetta Barrus Most carefree boy — Billy Howe 

Smartest boy — Robert Bisbee Class Orator — Vernon West 

Best girl athlete — Edna Thayer Class Gigglers — Lottie Algustoski & 

Best boy athlete — Billy Howe Christine Field 

Best all-around girl — Annetta Barrus Youngest girl — Fern Mosher 

Best all-around boy — Robert Bisbee Youngest boy — Wendell Pittsinger 

Man hater — Adeline Merritt Oldest girl — Barbara Burt 

Woman hater — Edward Fontaine Oldest Boy — Warren Russell 

Class bluff — Billy Howe Favorite subject — Typing 

Class poet — Winifred Packard Favorite gum — Spearmint 

Cutest girl — Fern Mosher Favorite sport — Swimming 

Cutest boy — Billy Howe Combined weight of class — 2996 lbs. 

Most talkative girl — Fern Mosher Average weight of class — 124 lbs. 

Most talkative boy — Vernon West Adeline Merritt 

Class Wit — Wendell Pittsinger 

CLASS NIGHT 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME Robert Bisbee 

CLASS HISTORY Phvllis Damon 

CLASS PROPHECY 7ern MoTer 

£????£ C T Y 0N THE PROPHETESS I!: lllZZWendeU Pittsinger 

CLASS WILL Ruth Barrus 

CLASS GRINDS Winifred Packard 

CLASS STATISTICS Adeline Merritt 

GRADUATION NIGHT 

ORATION— The Life of Horace Mann Helen Kolosewicz 

ORATION — Horace Mann, The Pioneer .„,.,.,„„., ............. Annetta Barrus 



20 



THE TATTLER 




U 



Class of 193 



Seated: Emily Ames, Marion Martin,- Robert Bradley, Violet Arnold, Ruth Black, 
Roberta Colburn, Helen Rosemarynoski, Jenny Nurczyk 

Standing: Elsie Pratt, Lena Burt, Margaret Linehan, Eleanor Swenson, Norma Nietsche, 
Virginia Edwards, Dorothy Joyal 

Back Row: Richard Ames, Catherine Emerson, Thomas Coogan, Ruth Newell, Douglas 
Fairbanks, Mildred Sanderson 



The Juniors are truly a worthy group 
To take the Seniors' place, 

For kindness and sensibility 
Are written on each face. 



How busy are they, since having learned 
That in idling the mind tends to rust; 

And you can be sure you'll never see 
This class 'neath a layer of dust. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 





21 




First Row: Peggy Macleod, Stacia Golash, Barbara Lloyd, Frank Taylor, Frances Metz, 
Edith Packard, George Warner, Bernice Weeks, Jean Carney, Hazel Finkle, 
Vera Harrison 

Second Row: Frank Soltys, Helen Batura, Doris Sabo, Rita LaFlamme, Richard Watling, 
Betty Penn, Richard Bates, Hazel Torrey, Roger Lloyd, Helen Childs, Dorothy 
Algustoski, Virginia Shumway, Carlton Field 

Third Row: Jane Bickford, Raymond Stone, Francis Malloy, Ruth Evans, Donald 
Mollison, Howard Sanderson, Warren Gould, Janice Wells, Barbara Edwards, 
Delia Whitney, James Stone 



Here are the Sophomores — as ever and still 

Dancing and laughing aloud ; 
But if they don't fasten themselves to their keel 

They'll find their ship lost in a cloud. 

They giggle and joke as they skip through the hall, 

Scolded each day — Yes 'tis true ; 
But after the lecture, ten minutes or so 

One wonders, What good did it do? 



22 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Harold Hillenbrand, Shirley Rhoades, Ashton Rustemeyer, Gertrude Richard- 
son, William Ryan, Florence Packard, Merwin Clark, Velma Brown, Harold 
Mollison, Jeannette Wright 

Second Row: Glendon Mason, Doris Williams, Joseph Brady, Gerald Larkin, Margaret 
Guyette, Jean Everett, Henry Willson, Dorothy Burnett, Bernard Murphy, 
Walter Lentner, David Dewey, Harold Mortimer 

Third Row: Marcia Ingellis, Kenneth Torrey, Leslie Cole, Marian Sabo, Myla Campbell, 
Raymond Johndrow 



These are the Freshmen 36 

The boys are so noisy in school! 

Tucked quietly among these rascally scamps 
Are shy lassies who never fool. 

Though a promising crew, you are indeed 
Oh, girls, row on with your A's 

In case your mischievous oarsmen 
Should falter and bring you delays. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

Extra-curricular activities play an impor- 
tant part in a high school education. What- 
ever they may be there is always much to 
be gained. In athletics there is an oppor- 
tunity not only to learn how to play the 
game but to learn sportsmanship and co- 
operation as well. A good athlete must have 
a keen mind and a quick eye. Also parti- 
cipation in the various sports adds greatly 
to the enjoyment of school life. In debat- 
ing and other types of oratory there is much 
of value. The ability to express oneself 
correctly and intelligently is certainly de- 
sirable. Debating or extempore speaking 
help much in the development of this qual- 
ity. Then, too, poise and naturalness are 
acquired from this speech work. Activity 
in dramatics affords keen enjoyment for 
many, and it also plays its part in develop- 
ing confidence and assurance. In music too, 
whether it be band or glee club, many find 
a pleasant relaxation from routine school 
work. Music is just another way of ex- 
pressing oneself, and so proficiency in this 
as in other activities is extremely beneficial 
to the student. Knowledge of music and its 
composers is gained in a delightful yet prac- 
tical manner. 

However, in the case of extra-curricular 
activities one should not forget the word 
"extra". The various outside projects 
should not interfere with school work. Often 
participation is forbidden if the student is 
not receiving a passing grade. This is not 
a severe restriction ; rather, it is as it should 
be. One should not engage in so many ac- 
tivities that it is difficult to maintain a pass- 
ing average. 

Moderate participation in these various 
projects is an enjoyable part of school life 
and it will continue to be a source of much 
pleasure when one has entered some profes- 
sion. The confidence and assurance gained 
from this will continue through life. 

Annetta Barrus '37 

FRIENDS 

"True friends are like jewels, 
Precious and rare." 

As a tiny sapphire catches the golden 
light of countless sunbeams, thus making- 
men's lives a little brighter, so do our 



friends reflect the acts of kindness we show 
to them, and, in turn, other lives are made 
a bit more gay. Did you ever think that 
friendship's chain is as eternal as the broad- 
ening ripples made in a pool of water by 
one tiny stone? 

Yet in this chain there are certain friend- 
ships we hold more sacred than others. 
They are the ones we perhaps chose more 
cautiously and now their golden memories 
remain. 

Whether you were a close chum, or a 
very intimate friend you have given of 
your best, and because of you, friendship's 
golden chain has been made stronger. 

Wendell Pittsinger '37 

LET'S BE OURSELVES 

Many of us have two sets of manners — 
those which we use at home and among 
friends, and those which we assume when in 
the company of strangers, or people super- 
ior to us. Often we try to impress strang- 
ers favorably by acting unnaturally. This 
usually proves unwise for unless we are 
well skilled in the art of pretending, we 
are likely to sound stiff and unreal. Many 
times we try to acquaint strangers with our 
entire store of knowledge in a single con- 
versation. Nothing is ever gained by this. 
Rather we are usually judged as being con- 
ceited and very boring. One who possesses 
much knowledge does not find it necessary 
to strive to acquaint the world with this 
fact. It is shown naturally by his actions 
and by his conversation. So, too, do we 
sometimes exaggerate our wit to such an 
extent as to sound foolish. 

Strangers are not particularly interested 
in how full of wisdom, or how very witty 
we are. Rather they wish to become ac- 
quainted with our characters. The traits 
of our characters cannot be shown by act- 
ing artificially. However we cannot suc- 
ceed in hiding them for long. Whether they 
are good or bad, they will come out event- 
ually, for they are real. Therefore, instead 
of being ashamed of our true characters, 
and trying to assume false ones, we must 
endeavor to improve ourselves. We must 
try to have characters of which we can be 
proud. Then we may with ease be our true 
selves at all times. 

Margaret Linehan '38 



24 



THE TATTLER 



A DAY WITH AN INDIAN SHEPHERD 

Nophaie opened his dark, somber eyes to 
the early dawn of another morning. Rising, 
he replenished the dying fire ; then he strode 
a few yards away from his camp. The 
grass was glistening with dewdrops and a 
clean, clear smell sweetened the air. No- 
phaie stood erect observing the charm of 
this beautiful valley. The sun had just 
risen and the mountains' snow-patched sum- 
mits reflected its rosy flush. Here and there 
a few clouds were stenciled on the light 
blue sky. 

The pine-scented air made this Indian's 
nose quiver and his dark eyes sparkle with 
delight. How he loved this valley! How 
happy he was — bringing the sheep to this 
fertile valley after the long travel over the 
desert on the way to market. 

White goats shone on the high bluffs, 
while Nophaie's sheep baa-ed a little way 
up the slope. When he heard the neighing 
horses hobbling into camp, Nophaie turned 
to start his camp chores. 

After these were finished he herded his 
sheep down to the pool which was fringed 
with willow and aspen. He lingered near- 
by while the sheep drank. When they had 
found a new grazing place, Nophaie left 
them in the care of the sheep-dogs and con- 
tinued his other duties. All day long they 
stayed in the valley resting so that they 
might go on the next day, fully refreshed 
from their desert journey. 

Late in the afternoon he rounded them 
together and again left them guarded by 
the faithful dogs. He settled himself com- 
fortably on a big stone near his camp to 
watch the sun set and night descend. Eagles 
were soaring homeward above sunlit crags; 
the pool below rippled with the faint eve- 
ning breeze ; the wild mountain sheep were 
silhouetted against the evening sky; and the 
snow on the mountains had a golden tinge 
which turned to gray as the sun sank slow- 
ly to rest. 

The dark pines swayed loftily back and 
forth with a gentle sighing swish. Night 
came and the deep velvet sky was studded 
with cold stars. The mountains threw a 
somber purple shadow over the valley. No- 
phaie rose quietly and wrapped himself in 
his blankets. And as he lay there breath- 
ing softly his eyes mirrored the cold stars 



A CITY MAN'S DREAM 

In the garden I would stroll, 
Knocking squashes with a pole, 
Snipping parsnips from a tree, 
Digging up the salsify. 

Picking sweet corn from the vine, 
Is a pleasant dream of mine. 
Round the garden I would walk, 
Nipping turnips from the stalk. 

Never gardened in my life, 
But I often tell my wife, 
That a garden is a boon 
And I hope to have one soon. 

Jeanette Wright '40 
ON SMOKING A CIGAR IN THE HOUSE 
(This is not taken from personal ex- 
perience. Through careful observation 
and hearsay, I am able to relate to 
you the details of this process.) 
There is a definite code of laws govern- 
ing this form of smoking. No veteran 
smoker would think of departing from these 
age-old customs. 

One must first settle himself in an 
overstuffed chair, open the paper to the 
sporting section and relax. Carefully bite 
off the end of the cigar and throw it in the 
general direction of the ash tray, taking 
care it does not go in. 

The cigar must be carefully lighted and 
a great sigh emitted before the match is 
blown out. The match must also miss the 
ash tray and land on the rug where it will 
be ground in. Complete relaxation follows 
this step. 

After a sufficient amount of ashes has 
collected, it must be knocked off onto the 
floor. The smoker usually has a troubled 
conscience for a moment after this impor- 
tant act. He then rubs it into the rug, eas- 
ing his conscience. 

When the cigar begins to singe his mous- 
tache, he realizes it is time to dispose of it. 
He places it on the nearby table and prompt- 
ly forgets it. Meanwhile the cigar con- 
tinues to burn, leaving a large scar on the 
polished surface of the table. Men call this 
innocent pastime cigar-smoking but then- 
wives have a different name for it. 

Edward Fontaine '37 

which faded idly out as Nophaie fell asleep. 

Barbara Lloyd '39 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



THE WAY TO SUCCESS 

If you would be successful 
In all you undertake, 
Apply yourself whole-heartedly 
To efforts that you make. 

'Tis true one meets with massive clouds, 
But after showers, sun; 
So ne'er should you tear down in haste 
The task you've just begun. 

Courage is the golden key, 

The gateway to success. 

Be certain that each task is right; 

It's dangerous to guess. 

Build your tower of knowledge strong. 
Blend patience through the wall; 
And strong ambition must be there 
Lest yonder structure fall. 

You'll know your tower long will stand, 
Although you're still a youth, 
For far below you'll see the base 
Of loyalty and truth. 

Winifred Packard '37 

THE FUTILITY OF WAR 

(This essay received honorable mention in 
the state-wide contest conducted by the 
Massachusetts Federation of Women's 
Clubs.) 

War — a word which strikes terror into 
the hearts of all thinking people, the most 
feared of all events today. 

In the beginning people warred only for 
defense against something which oppressed 
them. Gradually war came to be used as 
an instrument of greed. Then jealousy, 
hate, and fear became the chief causes of 
war. In the period preceding the Civil 
War this instrument was not the stupend- 
ous destructive force which prevailed in the 
Civil War and in a greater degree, in the 
World War. In this present era of inven- 
tion there are enough destructive agencies 
to wipe out civilization completely. Poi- 
son gases, terrible explosives, thousands of 
airplanes, ships, tanks, and invisible rays — 
these are capable in time of war of com- 
pletely destroying mankind. What does all 
this accomplish? 

In the last war approximately twelve mil- 
lion men were killed. When we realize 
that in all the wars previous to the world 
conflict there were only approximately four 
and a half million killed, it is easy to see 
that another conflict would be the end. 



These twelve million men were between the 
ages of eighteen and forty-five — the cream 
of the world. As a result, the whole growth 
of civilization was retarded. How many 
scientists, statesmen and other great men 
were in that twelve million? 

When considering the loss of life one 
must also think of the costs of the war eco- 
nomically. When the bills of the World 
War are all paid, according to former 
President Calvin Coolidge, the total cost 
will be in the vicinity of 400,000,000,000 
dollars — a sum which will not be paid off 
for generations. 

Following all wars comes a decline and 
loss in morals. One authority has said the 
chief causes of crime are contact with adult 
demoralizing patterns of behavior and fail- 
ure of the family to function effectively as 
a social educator. "The great war in com- 
mon with every war gave the men in service 
contact with demoralizing patterns of be- 
havior, and increased the failure of the fam- 
ily to function as a social educator, thus 
directing the race into channels of criminal 
activity." 

There is an old saying that war breeds 
war. In the case of the World War, the 
Franco-Prussian War was indirectly respon- 
sible for the ill feeling which resulted in 
the unmercifully severe terms of the Treaty 
of Versailles. This in its turn is doing its 
utmost today to influence the German peo- 
ple with jealousy, fear, and hate. It is no 
wonder then that to them Hitler does not 
seem mad when he shouts, "How can we 
burn into the consciousness of every Ger- 
man a sense of oppression and humiliation, 
until in sixty million minds the common 
shame and common hate shall flow into a 
fiery sea of flame, in the heat of which will 
be forged a steely determination and a cry 
go forth, — We will have our weapons back." 
One of the aims of the allies in the World 
War was "To make the world safe for de- 
mocracy, or to fight in the war to end war." 
Today the countries of the world are better 
armed than ever before, and there are more 
dictators than could possibly be conceived 
back in 1918. 

In view of these facts that wars have 
been economically, socially, and politically 
useless and destructive, what better state- 
ment can be made than that "WAR Is FU- 
TILE." 

Robert Bisbee '39 



26 



THE TATTLER 



NOCTURNE 

As the sun of the western sky 

sinks quietly behind the horizon, 
Night creeps ever onward 

silently, stealing forward. 
The birds calm their ruffled feathers, 

and the breezes softly sigh. 
The brooks seem to still their ripple, 

and from far off come the strange 
Lowing sounds of cows going home 

from green pastures. 
The flowers in the lea 

softly nod their heads in profound slum- 
ber 
While from above God's 

daisies twinkle onward through the night. 
The moon silently slips from behind 

her shroud, and lights up all the universe. 
The things of nature silently 

slumber on through the soft, sleepy night. 
Rita LaFlamme '39 
PEKINGESE PROGRESS 

Say, Blossom, do you know what all this 
fuss is about? First, they have to scrub 
me and brush me and comb me, and now 
they tie a ribbon on my neck! What's the 
big idea? What? You think I'm leaving? 

goodness! now I suppose I'll be cooed 
over and petted till I'm just about crazy ! 
Oh, you don't think those could be the 
people I'm going with, do you? But I guess 
they must be. Well, here I go; 'bye, Blos- 
som; maybe I'll be seeing you and maybe 

1 won't. So long! 

Whee! what a smooth car! But why does 
the driver sit out in front? O-mi-gosh if 
it isn't Snooty ! — Hey, mister that hurts 
when you pick me up like that, and don't 
catch my tail in the door. — Hi, Snooty! 
What? I should call you Ching Ling? Oh, 
well, it's all the same to me. But where do 
you live, 'cause I suppose I belong to your 
mistress now, don't I? At the which? The 
St. Regis? And we'll be there in a few min- 
utes? Well, I hope I like the "Madame", 
as you call her. 

^s ^s ;•; i£ s$s 

Is this it? We're stopping. What does 
that man stand out there for? He's the 
doorman? Oh, I thought he was going to 
a costume party! Now where do we go? 
In the elevator? What's that? Oh, I feel 
funny ! You say this is the elevator. Oh, 
I see. Is this where you live? Oh — oh! 
I'll bet this is Madame ! Why does she wear 
those dangly things around her neck? 



Wouldn't they be fun to break! What? 
We're going out again? To lunch at 
Pierre's? Well, come on; let's hurry. Oh, 
there's that funny feeling again. Maybe I 
will get used to it but I don't know. Oh, 
say, I don't want to sit in your lap, and 
those dangly things tickle — all right; have 
your own way; go ahead and act silly — I 
don't care. You think I have such lovely 
eyes — almost human? I'm sure the honor's 
all mine ! But I'm hungry. When will we 
be there, Ching? We're there now? Goody! 
How I'd like some nice hamburger! What! 
They don't serve hamburger at Pierre's? 
And you always have an English mutton- 
chop or scalloped oysters? Phooey! I 
want hamburger ! You think she's already 
ordered? I guess she must have, though, 
'cause here it comes. What on earth? Just 
what do you call this? Filet mignon? Well, 
shiver my timbers and scuttle my cargo ! 
Hey, I don't want that bib under my chin, 
and I don't want to sit on a pillow, either! 
Well, I'll try anything once, but I would 
like some hamburger. 

Now, that wasn't so bad for a beginning. 
What! Are we going now? Without my 
hamburger? Oh, what a life! Look out; 
don't shut the door in my face. Oh, thrills 
and heart throbs ! What do I smell around 
that corner? Ha, ha! You can't catch me 
now, Mister Doorman; I'm too far away! 
Oh, my great-aunt's funny bones ! Ham- 
burger ! 

Eleanor Swenson '39 
THE END OF THE DAY 
When twilight comes a-tripping 

Over the brow of the hill, 
And in the distance is heard 

The call of the whippoorwill, 
When the stars form a processional 

And march to their place in the sky, 
When a blanket of peace covers the earth. 

We feel that our God is nigh. 

Frances Metz '39 
PETE 
Pete, our dog, with big brown eyes, 
Has a look so wondrous wise, 
Not very large, but full of pep, 
He can't be beat, so watch your step. 

He plays ball, and chases hats, 
And woe to any neighbor's cat; 
He catches skunks when in a fog; 
He's almost human, our good old dog. 

Edith Packard '39 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 



SEVENTEEN AND THREE QUARTERS 

"Well I gotta dash, Jerry." With a 
yawn, Francis, Fran for short — he liked it 
better because that's what Irene called him 
— rose from the hammock where he had 
been indulging in a bit of day dreaming and 
conversation with his best pal Jerry. 

"I'm taking Irene to the dance tonight, 
so I'll see you tomorrow," with another 
yawn. 

"Yeah," grumbled Jerry, "All you ever 
do is spend your time dragging that dame 
around. Never have time for tennis, or 
fishing, or camping, anymore." 

"She isn't a dame," flared Fran. "She's 
the sweetest, loveliest — " 

"Yeah, I know," interrupted Jerry who 
had heard it all before. "But you're too 
young to bother with girls. Why only yes- 
terday I heard Dad say — " 

"Too young?" roared Fran. "Too young? 
Do you realize that my birthday is August 
first and I'll be eighteen?" 

"Yes, but you're — " 

"I'm seventeen and three quarters now 
and — and we're in love and we're going to 
be married as soon as — " 

"As soon as what?" asked Jerry. "Have 
you asked her yet? I suppose she said, 'Oh, 
this is so sudden," teased the unmerciful 
Jerry. 

"That's the last straw," roared Fran in- 
dignantly. "You can't talk that way about 
Irene. I'll never go fishing with you again. 
Goodbye." 

Jerry, who hadn't expected this outburst, 
rose to a sitting position with eyes wide and 
mouth open and emitted, "For gosh sakes," 
and, "for gosh sakes." 

Fran hadn't expected it either. Gosh, 
had he actually fought with good old Jerry? 
Well, he had no business talking that way 
about Irene. Just because he hadn't any 
girl. Gosh, he's probably jealous. Well, 
Jerry would have to make the first step 
toward reconciliation. 

A can with a red and white label ap- 
peared on the path. Mustn't kick it though. 
He was grown up. He — why, he was going 
to be married soon. Think of it. Irene in 
their little kitchen. 

Chimes sang out the hour and Fran au- 
tomatically counted them — seven. Heavens, 
he was supposed to be at Irene's at eight 
o'clock. He forgot he was a grown up — 
'an Adult' and wheeling around, kicked the 



can into the water, leaped a fence and 
bounded home through back allies because 
it was shorter. 

Breathless, he dashed up the stairs, three 
at a time. Oh, dash it — someone in the 
bathroom. Well, he'd — Where's that neck- 
tie — the one Irene liked? Look at those 
shoes. He bet that kid brother of his — . 
Well, no time to clean them, now. Maybe 
she wouldn't notice. 

Into the bathroom — what ! No hot water 
— a cold bath. For heavens sakes, what was 
the matter with the place? 

What was his mother saying? Did he 
mail the letters? No, he forgot but he 
would. 

"Oh, why did I stop to quarrel with that 
— that boob," groaned poor Fran. What 
would Irene say? 

Now to eat. He found his favorite de- 
sert. Where had he been? "Well, Mother, 
I haven't time to — . Yes, I'm taking Irene 
to the dance. What time is it? Oh 8:15? 
Oh, goodby. Gotta dash. Oh darn. Why 
did he have to kiss his mother. "Just like 
a baby" he snorted. They were going out? 
Yes, he knew where the key would be. Yes. 
Yes. Goodbye. 

He ran all the way, but just before he 
turned the corner near Irene's house he 
stopped, took out his comb, made sure his 
tie was straight, pulled down his coat and 
glanced at himself in the plate glass win- 
dow of the bakery shop. Then very se- 
dately he turned the corner. Mustn't seem 
too eager. Women should be kept in sus- 
pense. Still he'd have to explain that he 
was late because he'd been protecting her 
name. Irene — . Even her name was love- 
ly. Tonight — tonight, he would pop the 
question. 

Then something happened to make poor 
Fran awake from his reveries. There was 
— why it couldn't be Irene. Yes, it was, 
and she was clinging to someone's arm, 
laughing too. They were getting in the car 
parked out front. Fran's world crashed. 
To think that it could happen to him. Oh, 
there must be some mistake. But he real- 
ized there wasn't because he recognized her 
as the car rolled past — and she didn't even 
see him. 

For at least a half hour he wandered 
around feeling sorry for himself and vowing 
he was off women for life. He'd go back 
and apologize to Jerry — tell him he was 



28 



THE TATTLER 



right. He'd spend all his time with Jerry 
— go fishing — play tennis — anything Jerry 
wanted him to do. He'd be a martyr. 

He found himself home, turned up the 
walk and reached for the key hung on the 
post behind the honey suckle vine. A bee 
stung him, but he hardly noticed. Oh, he 
was suffering. He'd be a great success and 
make her sorry. 

There was his desert on the kitchen ta- 
ble. Mn-mm-gosh, what could be better 
than chocolate pudding and whipped cream? 
After three helpings he went up stairs, 
threw himself on the bed and finished his 
book that hadn't been touched for three, 
long, weeks — since he had known Irene. 



Ruth Cousino 



> O H 

O I 



TRUE 

When he began it 

Many sneered; 
But when he conquered 

Then they cheered. 

The quickest ones 
To give applause 

Are those who never 
Help the cause. 

Heed not the jeers. 

Be brave and strong; 
Only the victor 

Draws the throng. 



A STRANGER 

A stranger sat within my wall ; 
He came to me this very fall. 
He helped himself to all I owned, 
And never thought it was a loan. 

Sometimes I'd try to make him go, 
Or to me some politeness show; 
Then he would softly whish away, 
Just to come back that very day. 

He tore my choicest books and flowers, 

And kept the very latest hours 

Of any one I've ever seen, 

And for my cake was very keen. 

He looked at me with eye so bright ; 
To see him was a pretty sight; 
He thought he owned my whole big house, 
That dearest, cunning, little mouse. 

Jean Everett '40 



LIFE'S LESSON 

Teach me, oh Life, that I may be 
Contented in adversity; 

That when my heart is crushed with woe, 
My face no trace of it may show; 

That when my soul with yearning's filled, 
That yearning may by me be stilled; 



What can be done 
Men never guess 

Until it's proven, 
By success. 

And those who sneer 
As you begin, 

Will boldly cheer 
The day you win. 



Not when life's well, but when 'tis ill, 
To bear it and be cheerful still. 

Teach me, oh Life, 'ere yet we part, 
To take this lesson to the heart. 

Jean Everett '40 



Jeanette Wright '40 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



29 




Seated: Helen Kolosewicz, Robert Bisbee, Annetta Barrus, Wendell Pittsinger, Fern 

Mosher 
Standing: Adeline Merritt, Phyllis Damon, Ruth Barrus, Winifred Packard 



bemior 

The members of the Senior Pro Merito 
Society for "36" and "37" are: 
Annetta Barrus 
Ruth Barrus 
Robert Bisbee 
Phyllis Damon 
Helen Kolosewicz 
Adeline Merritt 
Fern Mosher 
Winifred Packard 
Wendell Pittsinger 

In the fall we elected officers as follows: 
President — Annetta Barrus 
Vice-President — Robert Bisbee 
Secretary — Wendell Pittsinger 

On October 17, 1936 the first Western 
Massachusetts Pro Merito Convention was 
held in Greenfield. Miss Riley and all but 
one of the Williamsburg group went in the 
school bus to Greenfield. 

At the business meeting each group gave 
an account of its activities. Officers were 
elected, and it was decided that the next 
convention would be held at Drury High 
School in North Adams. 

There were 185 delegates, representing 
17 different schools. 



A model assembly pro merito program was 
presented by the Technical High School 
from Springfield. Dr. Cockayne of Spring- 
field talked about the Tech. banner dis- 
played on the platform. 

After the banquet which was served in 
the school cafeteria, we heard an inspiring 
address by Hon. John W.. Haigis who spoke 
of the value of merit in later life. 

The second Pro Merito Convention was 
held at Drury High School, North Adams, 
on May 22, 1937. 

Ten Pro Meritos with Miss Dunphy went 
from Williamsburg. 

John Eldridge, president at the conven- 
tion, presided at the business meeting, at 
which reports from all schools present were 
heard. 

A play was presented by the High School, 
after which we went to the cafeteria for 
the banquet. In the afternoon we inspected 
the school and heard a very interesting ad- 
dress by Mr. Grover C. Bowman, President 
of North Adams State Teachers College. 

At the election of officers, Eleanor Swen- 
son was elected Secretary for the coming 
year. 



30 



THE TATTLER 




Seated: Violet Arnold, Ruth Black,, Eleanor Swenson 
Standing: Margaret Linehan, Roberta Colburn 



Junior Pro Merito 



President, RUTH BLACK 

Vice-president, ELEANOR SWENSON 

Secretary and Treasurer, VIOLET ARNOLD 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



31 




Orators, standing — Thomas Coogan, Ruth Black, Vernon West, Winifred Packard, 

Adeline Merritt, (Phyllis Damon absent) 
Debaters, seated — Robert Bisbee* Annetta Barrus* Wendell Pittsinger* 

Roberta Colburn* 
Coaches, seated — Mrs. Raymond A. Warner, Miss Phyllis Baker 
:;: National Tournament Entrants 



Forensic Group 



OFFICERS OF SOCIETY 

President — Annetta Barrus 
Vice-President — Robert Bisbee 
Secretary — Wendell Pittsinger 
Treasurer — Phyllis Damon 
Executive Committee 
Ruth Barrus 
Roberta Colburn 
Ruth Black 
The big event in Forensics for W. H. S. 
this year was the invitation extended by the 
Executive Council of the National Forensic 
League to our debaters to participate in the 
National Speech Tournament held in Jack- 
sonville, Illinois on May 1-7. This invitation 
came as an expression of appreciation for 
the work Williamsburg High School had 
done to build interest in speech in the high 
schools in Massachusetts, especially in con- 
nection with the first state-wide speech 
tournament which was held in Williamsburg 
last year. Only four other schools in the 
United States were invited, the remaining 
contestants being state champions. Of these 
there were 63 schools sending champion de- 



bate teams. 

The Tournament was a never-to-be-for- 
gotten event. Our debate teams, with a to- 
tal of 5 debates, each competed with teams 
having a minimum of sixty and a maximum 
of 150 debates on the subject of the year. 
However they tied with Topeka, Kansas and 
Kimbal, Nebraska; lost to Jacksonville, Illi- 
nois and Cherokee, Iowa; and won a deci- 
sive victory with a rating of "outstanding" 
over Springfield, Missouri. The first night, 
at the banquet, our coach, Williamsburg 
High and all the schools from Massachusetts 
were honored when the President of the 
N.F.L. presented Mrs. Warner with the Dis- 
tingished Service Key — an award earned by 
only thirteen persons up to this year. 

Previous to this, each team had debated 
with a team from Peekskill, N. Y. at Wil- 
liamsburg in December; a team from Hop- 
kins Academy at Hadley in the Pre-State 
Tournament, and teams from Groton, Had- 
ley, and Warren in the State Tournament 
at Charlton. 

(Continued on page 38) 



32 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Richard Ames, Warren Russell, William Howe, Lawrence Corbett, Robert 

Bisbee 
Second Row: Richard Watling, Coach, Mr. Foster, George Warner, Manager, Douglas 

Fairbanks 



Boys' Basketball Team 



W.H.S. 


15 


Raiders 


31 


W.H.S. 


20 


Cummington Boys 


Club 25 


W.H.S. 


31 


Alumni 


24 


W.H.S. 


18 


Ashfield 


35 


W.H.S. 


35 


Powers Institute 


13 


W.H.S. 


30 


Charlemont 


31 


W.H.S. 


38 


Powers Institute 


22 


W.H.S. 


15 


Raiders 


21 


W.H.S. 


16 


Charlemont 


31 


W.H.S. 


23 


Clarke School 


23 


W.H.S. 


27 


Raiders 


40 



This year the boys had a rather tough 
season in basketball with only two veterans 
remaining from last year's team. Although 



they were rather weak they won four games 
and lost eight. Some of the games were 
very exciting to watch, especially the Char- 
lemont game at Williamsburg; the two 
teams were tied and they went into an 
overtime period, Charlemont finally win- 
ning. 

At the close of the season Williamsburg 
was invited to the M.S.C. tournament to 
play against Powers Institute. We won the 
game by a large score. This is the second 
time Williamsburg has played in a prelim- 
inary game at M.S.C. and it has been a 
great honor. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



33 





"' : ' 



r*8r 



1 a' U" i~ U 



V V J 




Seated: Richard Bates, Adam Golash, William Ryan, Richard Ames, Donald Howe, 
Robert Bisbee, William Howe 

Standing: Frank Taylor, William Brady, Warren Russell, Manager Soltys, George 
Warner, Coach Snow, Stephen Golash 



Baseball Team 



Considering the late organization of the 
baseball team, it has succeeded fairly well 
by winning 40% of its games to date. In 
the first game there was a shut-out for the 
Smith Academy pitcher who won it 7 to 0. 
Ames and Taylor were the batteries for 
Williamsburg. We bowed to Charlemont in 
the second game, 9 to 4. These two were 
hard fought battles and proved very inter- 
esting to watch. Ryan and Clark were on 
the mound and Taylor was catcher. Clark 



and Ryan were the pitchers of the third 
game and they topped Ashfield, 5 to 4. One 
of the most exciting games to watch was the 
game played at home with Charlemont 
which we won 10 to 9. Ryan and Ames 
pitched in this game for Williamsburg, Tay- 
lor caught. Ashfield proved too much for 
us and beat us 13 to 5 in the last game that 
we played. There is still another to come 
and we have high hopes of winning this in 
order to win at least half of our games. 



34 



THE TATTLER 




First Row: Dorothy Harrison, Dorothy Burnett, Edna Thayer, Katherine Ozzolek, Myla 
Campbell, Stacia Golash 

Second Row: Manager, Barbara Burt, Ruth Black, Coach, Mr. Foster, Ruth Dodge, 
Norma Nietsche, Emily Ames 



Girls* Basketball Team 



This year the Girls' Basketball Team 
showed an entirely different spirit than that 
of the two previous years. Although every- 
one knows Coach Foster has no particular 
enthusiasm about interscholastic basketball 
for girls, he certainly did help the team this 
year by giving them a new aim. He showed 
them that it was not only the score at the 
end of the game that counted but the ex- 
perience and genuine fun the game brought. 

The second game with Sanderson was 
finally cancelled after being postponed 
three times. The reason for the cancella- 



tion was scarlet fever. Of all the other 
games the team played, the second one with 
Powers was the most exciting, although 
Powers finally won by the score of 18 to 
16. The other games were all spirited but 
not as thrilling as the Powers game. 
The scores of these follow: — 



W.H.S. 


27 


Powers 


15 


W.H.S. 


19 


Charlemont 


20 


W.H.S. 


12 


Sanderson 


34 


W.H.S. 


30 


Alumnae 


23 


W.H.S. 


16 


Powers 


18 


W.H.S. 


16 


Charlemont 


32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



35 



J 



ES 



Mrs. Warner: Christine, what import 
from China does the U. S. find most neces- 
sary? 

Christine: The Gypsy Moth. 



Miss Baker, struggling with World His- 
tory class: Meanwhile, since the downfall of 
Rome, what has Italy been doing? 

Brilliant student: Raising Italians! 



Mr. Foster: Katherine, you weren't here 
this morning, were you? 

Richard Ames, drearily: No-o-o-o-o. 



Mr. Foster (in General Science) : Coal is 
formed from vegetable matter. What is 
vegetable matter? 

Bernard Murphy, hesitantly: Garbage? 



Mr. Foster, teaching First Aid: Soltys, 
what would you do first, if your brother, 
Joe, got gassed in the refrigerator? 

Frank: Let him stay there! 



Mr. Foster (after a lecture on laziness) : 
If you want the comforts of life, how are 
you going to get them? 

Herbie Kellogg: Oh! Get married. 



Mrs. Nit: What was your mother's name 
before she was married, Miss Damon? 
Phyllis: "Wells". 
Mrs. Nit: And your father's? 



The teacher had been giving a lesson on 
Creation when the student interrupted with 
the remark : My father says we are descend- 
ed from apes. Teacher, politely: Your pri- 
vate family matters have no interest for 
the class. 



Mr. Foster: I'd be watching my step, 
Dewey, if I were in your boots. 

Small Dewey: You couldn't get in them! 
Mr. Foster: What are they? Too big? 



Miss Baker, hopefully: Johndrow, what is 
the meaning of the word, broach? 
Raymond: It's some kind of a bug. 



Annetta (in French): I don't see why 
you have a carat after the word "pendant". 

Miss Dunphy: Well, there should be a 
whole row of vegetables after that error! 



Mr. Foster: All those boys who are 
going to the game this afternoon be here 
on time ! 

Christine Field (anxiously): I'm going! 



Douglas Fairbanks was speeding to a rail- 
road crossing as was the on-coming locomo- 
tive. 

Doug: Shall we try to beat him, Amesie? 

Dick: Well-er I don't care as long as it 
isn't a tie. 



>oni 



Little Old Lady — Christine Field 

I Dream Too Much — William Brady 

Is I Gotta Go to School, Ma? — Edna Thayer 

Something to Remember — Trip to the Office 

A Little Bit Independent — Ruth Cousino 

Sweet Violet — Douglas Fairbanks 

I've Got Rhythm — Emily Ames 

Freckle Face — David Dewey 

Carry Me Back to Old Virginia — 

Wendel Pittsinger 
It's All So New to Me — (Merwin Clarke, 

dancing) 

Sweetheart Let's Grow Old Together — 

Lottie and Billy Howe 



I Don't Want to Make History — 

Ruth Cousino 
Sleepyhead — Warren Russell 

Tenting on the Old Camp Ground — 

Ruth Barrus 
The Rose in Her Hair (Fern's) — 

Richard Ames 
When You and I Were Young Maggie — 

Thomas Coogan 

Don't Mention Love to Me — Adeline Merritt 

Swing High, Swing Low — Edith Packard 

What's the Reason I'm Not Pleasing You — 

Sophomore's petition to Mr. Foster 



36 



THE TATTLER 



Alumni Editor — Fern Mosher 
ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President, George Judd 
Vice-President, Bob Nash 
Secretary, Thomas Barrus 
Treasurer, Alfred Pomeroy 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Dorothy Colburn 
Robert Mathers 
Walter Kulash 
Robert Brown 
Lawson Clark 
Leslie Packard 

BIRTHS 
A son to Virginia Warner LaRochelle '34. 
A daughter to Lawson Clark '33. 
A son to Millie Dansereau Ryan '24. 
A daughter to Catherine Burke Peeney '23. 
A son to Pauline Webb '28 and Richard 

Merritt '27. 
A son to Mary Dunn Novek '33. 
A daugher to Alice Nash Packard '27 and 

Leslie Packard '27. 
A daughter to Clary Snow '29. 
A son to Kenneth Nash '16. 
A son to Chester Stemkowski '23. 
A son to Alice Graves Streeter '24. 



MARRIAGES 

John Breguet '23 to Mary Costello. 

Philip Cook '32 to Dorothy Morse. 

Helen C. Demerski '35 to Arthur J. Morin. 

Jane C. Kiely '16 to William Scully. 

Clarence Larkin '16 to Lena A. Hayden. 

Robert Merritt '30 to Catherine Otis '31. 

Helen Alexander '05 to Earnest Damon. 

Edwin Breckenridge '25 to Margaret Mac- 
Court. 

Evelyn Russell '29 to Ralph Paysons. 
COLLEGE GRADUATES 

Allan Bisbee '35 — Northampton Commer- 
cial College. 

Harriet Dodge '33 — Smith College. 

Frederick Goodhue '33 — Massachusetts 
State College. 

Rowena Pittsinger '33 — North Adams State 
Teachers' College. 

Catherine Vining '35 — Northampton Conu 
mercial College. 

Louise Kellogg '33 — Cooley Dickinson Hos- 
pital. 

Ruth Pomeroy '32 — North Adams State 
College. 

Dorothy Metz '35 — Bryant College, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 



NEWS OF OTHER CLASSES 
1936 

Bernice Bickford — Post Graduate at W. 
H. S. 

Esther Clark — Working in Springfield. 

Alice Dresser — Smith Vocational School. 

Vardic Golash — Working in Hartford, Conn. 

Walter Golash — Massachusetts State Col- 
lege. 

Henry Howe — Working in Hartford, Conn. 

Florence Lloyd — Working in Bay State. 

Pauline Packard — Northampton Commer- 
cial College. 

Francis Packard — Working in Sommers, 
Conn. 

Marguerite Sabo — Working in Goshen. 

Sheila Swenson — Smith College. 

Ruth Sylvester — Working in Hartford, 
Conn. 

John Walshe — Parks Air College — Now 
working in Hartford, Conn. 

Howard Willson — Working in Northampton. 



1935 

Raymond Bradford — Prophylactic Brush 

Company. 
Gertrude Heath — Troy Children's Hospital. 
Evelyn Rustemeyer — North Adams State 

Teachers' College. 
Eleanor Wheeler — North Adams State 

Teachers' College. 
Albert Mosher — Working in Florence, 

Mass. 

1934 
Marie Allaire — Haydenville Brass Company. 
Dorothy Field — Springfield City Hospital. 
Louise Mosher — Working at Beebes. 
Edward Murphy — Working in Westfield. 

1933 
Charles Damon — Northampton Electric 

Light Co. (Engaged to Alice Kellogg). 
George Field — Haydenville Brass Company. 
Gladys Erwin — Northampton State Hospi- 
tal. 
Ruth Merritt — Transfer from Smith College 

to University of Iowa. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



The Illinois Trip 



On Thursday morning, April 29, about 
nine o'clock, the W. H. S. debate teams with 
their coach, Mrs. Warner and with Mr. Bar- 
rus as driver began the trip to Jacksonville, 
111. amid the shouted good-byes of the stu- 
dents. The first night was spent at Niagara 
Falls after we had traveled 396 miles in or- 
der to see the falls lighted. Unfortunately 
we were too late. However, we did see 
them Friday morning. The sight of the 
great American Falls tinted with the sun- 
light and with a rainbow in its mists gave 
us a feeling of awe. Later in the morning 
we crossed the border into Canada for 
breakfast. There the horse-shoe shaped 
falls of the Canadian side with their whirl- 
pools and spray wetting us as we stood on 
the bank impressed us with the majesty and 
power of nature. This was a morning filled 
with never-to-be forgotten sights and we 
were loath to leave and continue on our 
way. We drove along the shore of Lake 
Erie to Cleveland, Ohio, and then, a little 
south to Oberlin, Ohio where we spent the 
second night. In Ohio and on into Indiana, 
which we reached at 2:30 Saturday after- 
noon, we saw acres and acres of level rich 
land, and countless pigs, calves, sheep, and 
steers grazing. Saturday evening, we 
ate in Lafayette, Indiana, the site of the 
Tippecanoe Battlefield, and then we drove 
on to spend the night in Danville. Here we 
ran into some rather rainy weather but it 
failed to dampen our spirits. Sunday, 
about noon we arrived at Springfield, 
Illinois, where we had dinner at the 
Abraham Lincoln Hotel. Later we vis- 
ited Lincoln's Home and his Tomb. 
The latter was a beautiful memorial with 
statues of Lincoln representing his various 
professions. There is also a replica of the 
Statue of Lincoln by Daniel Chester French 
which is at the Memorial in Washington. We 
would like to have remained here longer 
but time did not permit, so, on we went to 
the Tournament. In the actual Tourna- 
ment the teams won one, tied two, and lost 
two. We were royally entertained while in 
Jacksonville. Each evening there was a 
banquet followed by a dance which we en- 
joyed very much. The various colleges in 
or near Jacksonville presented enjoyable 



programs for our entertainment. We were 
very sorry to leave Jacksonville on Wed- 
nesday for we had had a delightful time. 
The experience and inspiration gained from 
meeting and competing with the best speak- 
ers of the nation's high schools we will not 
soon forget. When we left the Tournament, 
our first objective was Mammoth Cave in 
Kentucky. On the way, we crossed the Mis- 
sissippi and Missouri Rivers by the Lewis 
and Clark Bridges. We took the hour trip 
through Mammoth Cave and saw many very 
interesting formations of stalactites and sta- 
lagmites. We left the Cave marveling at this 
natural wonder as we had at Niagara. Our 
next destination was Washington, D. C, 
which we reached Saturday morning, after 
two days of driving over the hills of West 
Virginia and Maryland. While there, we vis- 
ited the White House, the Senate, the House 
of Representatives, the Smithsonian Insti- 
tute, the Washington Monument and the 
Lincoln Memorial. We were able to see many 
of these sights due to the kindness of Con- 
gressman Treadway who so generously put. 
his car and chauffeur at our disposal. 

In the afternoon we drove out to Mount 
Vernon, and from there to Lee's Home and 
to the Arlington National Cemetery. This 
was an extremely impressive sight and we 
left Washington with a feeling of inspiration 
and awe. On the way to New York, our next 
point of interest, we stopped at the Gettys- 
burg Battlefield which was an instructive 
as well as a very interesting visit. We came 
into New York by way of the Holland Tun- 
nell and it sent shivers down our spines to 
feel ourselves rolling along through space 
in a watertight tube under the Hudson 
River. On Monday morning we took a tour 
through the studio department of Radio City, 
we saw all the famous buildings of New 
York, we went to the Battery from which 
we could see the Statue of Liberty, and we 
visited the Aquarium which was very in- 
teresting and appealing especially to Wen- 
dell. We left New York by way of the 
Bronx River Parkway and arrived home 
Monday evening feeling a little bewildered 
from all the wonderful sights which we had 
been so fortunate to see. 



38 THE 

NEW ENGLAND SPEECH 
TOURNAMENT 

Laconia, New Hampshire 
Five orators from W.H.S., Ruth Black, 
Thomas Coogan, Phyllis Damon, Winifred 
Packard, and Vernon West, motored to La- 
conia, New Hampshire, Friday, April 20, 
1937, to participate in the New England 
Speech Tournament. 

Saturday the preliminaries were held in 
the Laconia High School, a very atractive 
building. Ruth Black, Thomas Coogan and 
Vernon West placed second in their respec- 
tive divisions. Phyllis Damon received a 
placing of fourth, and Winifred Packard a 
placing of third. 



TATTLER 

In the final eliminations Ruth Black and 
Thomas Coogan rated in fourth places while 
Vernon West won third. 

The trip was a wonderful one, for we 
visited the State House at Concord, New 
Hampshire, as well as Lake Winnepesau- 
kee, with its striking panorama of snow- 
capped mountains. We are indeed very 
grateful for the kindness and hospitality of 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Rowe, at whose home 
we stayed. 

On the return trip, Sunday, we changed 
our route and enjoyed the beauty of the 
Vermont hills. The memory of Laconia 
will always be a pleasant one to us. 

Vernon West '37 



FORENSIC GROUP 



(Continued from page 31) 
During the year two preliminary debates 
were held. The first was in October on the 
subject: Resolved, that the United States 
should adopt a system of Radio Control 
similar to that of Great Britain. The de- 
baters were : Dorothy Harrison and Thomas 
Coogan for the Affirmative, and Ruth Black 
and Donald Gould for the Negative. Ruth 
Black was awarded first place and Thomas 
Coogan second place. 

The second preliminary debate was on the 
subject: Resolved: that the Several States 
should adopt a system of Unemployment 
Insurance in which the State, Employer, and 
Employee should each have a part. Robert 
Bradley and Norma Nietsche upheld the Af- 
firmative while Roberta Colburn and Doro- 
thy Joyal were on the negative. The judges 
gave first place to Roberta Colburn and sec- 
ond to Dorothy Joyal. 

But all the forensic activity was by no 
means confined to debating. This year, for- 
ensic work made much progress in oratory 
also. Under Miss Baker's efficient teach- 
ing the Spoken English classes took up the 
practice of effective speech as well as the 
theory. The Seniors developed a very suc- 
cessful speaking choir, many in both classes 
participated in the one-act plays presented 
for the dual purpose of speech-training and 
fund-raising, and a number of students took 
part in the oratory elimination contests. 
There were six tournament orators this 
year. Phyllis Damon gave "The Madman", 



and Adeline Merritt gave "Four on A 
Heath" in the Dramatic Reading group. 
Vernon West gave "Youth Speaks" and 
Ruth Black gave "Spartacus to the Gladia- 
tors" in the Oratorical Declamation group; 
and Winifred Packard gave "At The De- 
clam Contest" and Thomas Coogan gave 
"Let Brotherly Love Continue" in the Hu- 
morous Reading group. These orators com- 
peted in the Pre-State Tournament at Had' 
ley, the State Tournament at Charlton, and 
the New England Tournament at Laconia, 
New Hampshire. West and Coogan com- 
peted in all three final rounds; Ruth Black 
competed in two final rounds. Degrees and 
keys were earned as follows : — Degree of 
Excellence and Sapphire Key won by An- 
netta Barrus, Robert Bisbee, and Wendell 
Pittsinger; Degree of Honor and Emerald 
Key won by Roberta Colburn ; Degree of 
Merit and Unjeweled Key won by Vernon 
West, Phyllis Damon, Winifred Packard, 
and Thomas Coogan. Roberta Colburn and 
Thomas Coogan are both Juniors and each 
will wait until next year when they will re- 
ceive their degrees and keys — probably of 
a higher order after participation in for- 
ensics as Seniors. 

The W. H. S. Debating Society, after ten 
years of activity, voted to change its name 
to "Williamsburg High School Forensic 
Club" in order to more truly express the 
purpose for which the present day speak- 
ers are striving, that of all-round develop- 
ment in public speaking, including extem- 
poraneous speech and oratory as well as de- 
bating. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Packard's Soda Shoppe 



OPPOSITE TOWN HALL 



School Supplies, Magazines, Greeting Cards 

FILMS & DEVELOPING 
Hoods Ice Cream McKesson Products 

FOUNTAIN & BOOTH SERVICE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

J. STEWART MOLLISON 

DAILY EXPRESS 
NORTHAMPTON TO PLAINFIELD 

Tel. 3402 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MacLEOD TREE CARE 

Telephone 3451 Williamsburg 

J. W. PARSONS & SON 

Tractors and Farm Machinery 
131 Bridge Street Tel. 2885 Northampton 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

James R. Mansfield & Son 

Funeral Service 
HAYDENVILLE 

William Baker £^ Son 

General Merchandise 
Service Courtesy Satisfaction 

CHESTERFIELD, MASS. 



Modern Education 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A little fore- 
sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will help 
them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 

O. T. DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 
201 Main St. Tel. 184-W Northampton 



McCallum's 

You'll Find It In Our Basement 

When we say "You'll Find It In Our Basement" we mean 
it to the last letter. It's a daylight basement wherein 
you'll find about everything you could wish for in gad- 
gets, cooking utensils, glassware and china .... and in 
our basement is a big toy department. 



Let Daniel Outfit You for Graduation 

Your outfit will be correct but not expensive 
Ask about our special proposition to Graduates 

HARRY DANIEL ASSOCIATES 

NORTHAMPTON 

Specialized Training For Business Employment 

Business is a practical vocation. It requires certain definite ability of those who 
seek employment — who hope to be chosen from the crowd. Secretarial, Ac- 
counting and Business Administration training are the most effective avenues 
leading to employment and advancement in business. 

Through close association, we are familiar with the requirements of business 
offices. Our graduates are equipped to do the work necessary to secure office 
positions and to win advancement. Complete information on courses will 
gladly be sent on request. 

w. h. McCarthy business college 

45 Gothic Street Northampton Tel. 2186 



Compliments of 



The Haydenville House 



Newell Funeral Home 



1 



R. D. NEWELL 



74 KING STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 



C. F. JENKINS 



Stationery 



Greeting Cards 
Ice Cream 



Medicines 



WILLIAMSBURG 



CHILSON'S SHOPS 



W. LEROY CHILSON 



Six Distinctive Departments 



Furniture Upholstering 

Harness Shop 

Slip Covers, Cushions 



Automobile Plate Glass 

Auto Top and Body Work 

Awnings and Canvas Goods 



31 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



C. A. SHARPE, INC. 



Maytag Aluminum Washers 

Electric Refrigeration 
Quiet May Burners 



RCA Radios 



16 CRAFTS AVENUE 



NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



CHAS. A. BOWKER 



Hardware and General Merchandise 



TELEPHONE 245 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Refrigerators 



Radi 



10s 



Washers 



V< 



apfius 



ELECTRIC SHOP 



IS7MAIN STREET PHONE IJO? : kV 

Northampton , Mass. 



Automtaic Oil Heat 
Wiring Radio Repairs 



Compliments 
of 



A FRIEND 



FRANKLIN KING, JR. 

INSURANCE 

Fire Automobile Life 

277 MAIN STREET TELEPHONE 610 NORTHAMPTON 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. F. BURKE 

WILLIAMSBURG 



HEATING & HEATING APPLIANCES 

Established 1886 

FOR OIL 

Delco Conditionair, Boiler Burner Unit & Oil Burner 

FOR COAL 

Anchor Coal Stoker and Vacu-Draft System 

Why not Save $5.00 per ton on your Coal Bills? 

E. A. & E. N. FRARY 

Tel. 2952-M Opp. Passenger Station — Northampton 



HENRY A. BIDWELL 

Insurance of Every Form 

BIDWELL TRAVEL SERVICE 

CRUISES — STEAMSHIP TICKETS — TOURS 

Book Early 

NONOTUCK SAVINGS BANK BUILDING 
78 Main Street (Second floor) Northampton 

Office Phone 351 Residence, 160 South Street, Phone 3-18 



ALLISON ■ SPENC 



100 Main St., Northampton 



Photographer to Williamsburg High School 
Since 1917 with two exceptions 



'THANKS BURGY" 



CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R. BISBEE 

Tel. Chesterfield 4-2 Tel, Chesterfield 4-3 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 

Grain, Feed, Fertilizers, Salt, Cement and Agricultural Tools 

Bird <£ Sons Roofing Papers Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material Oliver Plows and Cultivators High Grade Grass Seed 

Norfolk Paint 

Get our prices on anything you need 
before ordering elsewhere 

STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 
Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg, Mass., R, F. D, 1 



Northampton Commercial College 


"The School of Thoroughness" 


Northampton 


Massachusetts 


JOHN C. PICKETT, Principal 


42nd year 


42nd year 


When in need of 




Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes, 

for Men and Boys 


Jones' Glad Gardens 


TRY 


Bulbs Perennials 


THE FLORENCE STORE 

90 Maple St. Florence 


Cut Flowers Floral Designs 


Telephone 828-W J. A. Longtin 
Service — Quality — Satisfaction 


Tel. 3364 Haydenville 


Compliments 


CANDLE LIGHT DEN 


of 


WILLIAMSBURG 


John H. Graham 


LIGHT LUNCHES 




Candy — Ice Cream — Soda 


Coal Oil Ice 


Cigars — Cigarettes 


WILLIAMSBURG 


E. BARKER, PROP. 


Compliments of 


Compliments 


GRAVES GARAGE 


DR. G. P. HALL 


WILLIAMSBURG 





Compliments 

NOBLE & FLYNN 

REGISTERED 
PHARMACISTS 



ICE CREAM SODAS 
24 Main St. 



COLLEGE ICES 
Northampton 



YOU may always depend 
upon the quality of flowers 
which come from - - - - 




FLOWER* 



Knight's Hair dressing 

Frederic's Vita Tonic and Vitron 

Permanent Waving 

Croquignole Self-setting 

Marceling Fingerwaving 

Opp. St. Michael's School 
74 State Street Northampton 



FOR GRADUATION 

All Types of 

Cameras & Supplies 



Winthrop Foster 

165 Main Street Northampton 



FLORSHEIM SHOES 



For Men and Women 



THE DAVID BOOT SHOP 

221 MAIN STREET 
NORTHAMPTON 



WHEN YOU THINK OF 

Music 
THINK OF 

THE MUSIC HOUSE 

O. S. P. Inc. 
Pianos - Music - Records - Instruments 

NORTHAMPTON 



A NATURAL - - 5$ 

The 

DRAPER 

Cigar 

The E, & J. Cigar Co. 

Northampton 



Le VALLEY'S BARBER SHOP 



Next to First National Store 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 





A GOOD ASSORTMENT 




OF 




Trunks Bags 


Compliments 


and Small Leather Goods 


of 


HARLOW LUGGAGE STORE 

28 CENTER ST. NORTHAMPTON 




LOCKSMITH 


A FRIEND 


Pierce's Paint Store 




Paints Wall Paper Glass 




Painter's Supplies 




196 Main St. Tel. 1207 Northampton 


ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 


■* 


for every Sport 


Compliments 


T. A. PURSEGLOVE CO. 


of 


15 State St. Northampton 




HILL BROS. 




Quality Merchandise 


A FRIEND 


ST. MARY'S BLANKETS 
KENWOOD BLANKETS 
CHATHAM BLANKETS 
CARTER'S UNDERWEAR 

KNICKERNICK UNDERWEAR 




118 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON 





Compliments 


Compliments of 


of 




E. J. Gusetti 


A FRIEND 


HAYDENVILLE 




A. Soltys 


Socony Service 


MEATS GROCERIES 


Station 


VEGETABLES 




Telephone 223 Haydenville 


WILLIAMSBURG 


Beebe's Lunch 


Compliments of 


A good place to eat Home Cooking 




DINE & DANCE ACCOMMODATIONS 


C. 0. CARLSON 


Berkshire Trail A. L. Beebe, Prop. 

HAYDENVILLE 


GOSHEN 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Luce's Garage 


Erwin and Ethel Allen 

Poultry Dealers 



-J 



Compliments of 

THE CLARY FARM 

SILAS SNOW 
Try Our Maple Syrup 

Telephone 3563 

WILLIAMSBURG 


DAMON LODGE 

invites 

Transient, Week-end and 
Permanent Guests 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

MRS. C. R. DAMON 

43 South Street Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

FIRST NATIONAL 
STORES 

WILLIAMSBURG 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Sporting Goods 

Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis and 
Camping Items 

Foster-Farrar Co. 

162 Main Street 
Northampton, Mass. 


Village Hill Nursery 

ALPINES, PERENNIALS 

and 
ANNUAL PLANTS 

Williamsburg 


Williamsburg Garage 

C. K. HATHAWAY 
Tel. 4351 

Service Station 

Battery Service 
Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 

WILLIAMSBURG 


Hillcrest Farm 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 

SINGLE COMB 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 

WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments 

of 

Fleming's Boot Shop 

NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 


FRANK E. DAVIS 

164 Main St. Northampton 

Graduation Gifts 

Watches and Jewelry Repairing 

BUYERS OF OLD GOLD 


Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 


PIZZITOLA MUSIC 
STUDIO 

"The School of Achievement" 

Banjo, Mandolin, Guitar and 

kindred instruments 

TEL. 2650 

142 MAIN STREET NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

WM. J. SHEEHAN 
& COMPANY 

HAYDENVILLE 



For the young man who grad- 


Compliments of 


uates this year we have every- 




thing that he will need for this 


R. A. WARNER 


important occasion. 


FRESH MILK and CREAM 


MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

NORTHAMPTON 


DELIVERED DAILY 

Williamsburg 


COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 

Northampton's Liveliest Store 


ROSCOE K. NOBLE 


Our best wishes to the 
Williamsburg Graduates 


General Insurance 
Real Estate 


Colodny's 


Office Phone 2986-W 78 Mam St. 


Home of Stein-Block Clothes 

32 Main St. Northampton 


Res. Phone 2986-R Northampton 


ELY FUNERAL HOME 


Compliments of 


CHARLES E. ELY 


TWIN 


Lady Assistant 


CLEANING and DYE WORKS 


Tel. 1292-W Northampton 


North Street Northampton 




FOR 


E. J. GARE & SON 

JEWELERS 


Reliable Wrist Watches 
And Jewelry 

VISIT 


We buy old gold 


DEARING'S 

Jewel Store 


112 Main St. Northampton 


116 Main St. Northampton 

2nd Floor 



^f flelcalj Cyrinhng C> C/ ublxsking Lyo. 

NCORPOR.Al ED 

COLLEGE and SCHOOL 
PRINTING 



51 Clark Avenue 



Ph 



one 



, 







Northampton 



MBSCnMn 






■•• ■ *<*s 



J&W 



•a ■ 



■ 



skkxHm 

Hfinfl 

■ 
I. 



■ I 

■Ikx 



BHSSd II 

I 



••>•;- 



SB 

m 



>H^ v 



Hi 



M 



■ 















■ 



IX 





















. 


LM it II 

1 Itfctt 

1 it Cm 


ill 

III 


iHifttMlHEnfMilltfriltlvT'llliMtltMi 




[ jllll 


lit 




III? fMllLSflCftlXllfl 
[[lf[| >Mlt(itM^ H f 1 ' llHtllLllll-MlitlllJl 




[ift 1 


I fcrlfl 


kit 




i f t rfl^fl^^HI^^^KjnHH^r^^^^^l^^^HHfl 


j: ; 






Ira 


i f It ' 


irliCMMlil'triiittWS iinH(*riPf i' 1 




lUSr^H^H IH8HHH Wl 


Mipin,! ;' ' ^ I 'Mf flitiltwl 




lititi 












t»t 91 Iil it iif if tii t»i wit 


n 1 1 ill 






iliHiitiittii